SF RETIREES WEARING OF BERET AND UNIFORM

From: Randy Givens [mailto: rg2162@earthlink.net ]

Ok guys,

I read the regs (AR 670-1) and electronically searched the regs for “green beret” and “retiree.”

You can do the same yourselves at: http://www.army.mil/usapa/epubs/pdf/r670_1.pdf

Go to the URL above, download the reg, then use the “find” box at the top of the page.

Right next to it are forward and backward arrows so you can find the next use of the words you are searching for.

You can search all 362 pages of the regs in a heartbeat that way.

I cut and pasted below everything I think you need to know that I could find in the reg.

I could not find anything in this reg about “uniform of retirement.” In fact, the reg says you can wear either the uniform as it was when you retired OR the modern equivalent of your uniform on the date you retired.

30-3 c. Retired personnel not on active duty may wear either the uniform reflecting their grade and branch on the date of

their retirement, or the uniform for personnel in the Active Army of corresponding grade and branch, when appropriate,

but may not intermix the two uniforms

I did find that SF qualified soldiers can choose to wear the green beret while they are at service schools.

There are also provisions for former (not retired) soldiers to wear the army uniform.

Since there is a dearth of specific information on retirees wearing the green beret, it takes some interpolation and reasonable assumptions.

Since the standard headgear for guys and gals, legs, REMF’s, clerks and jerks, is now a black beret;

- and the regs infer that retirees and former soldiers can wear that black beret;

- and the Army Echoes (Retiree newsletter) says you can wear the black beret (see extract posted below regs);

- it only makes sense to me that SF qualified retirees and former soldiers can wear the Green Beret on occasions when they are not on active duty and when they are otherwise authorized to wear an army hat. Note that they are forbidden to wear the BDU’s and field caps. Except for dress blues, retirees and former soldiers are only authorized to wear berets OR their old Service or Overseas hats.

- However, retirees and former soldiers may CHOOSE to wear the BLACK beret in lieu of the old Flying Saucer or C**t cap.

- Now since they are authorized to wear a black beret, it only makes sense that SF qualified folks be allowed to wear the Green Beret instead of the Black Beret. The Army uniform regulation does NOT forbid you from doing so.

Since once upon a time I was an SF B detachment S-1, my interpretation of the regs is hereby unofficial!

As for me, I sure as hell am not going to wear any white patch on my left shoulder … it’d make me look like somebody from the Salvation Army, and I’m not that religious!

I’ll just leave my left shoulder bare of any unit insignia, and I’ll put my green beret on my head, with my SF crest over my right pocket since I’m a member of the SF Regiment and am otherwise SF qualified.

Here are the regs, you try and figure out a better interpretation!

Just remember, wear the uniform proudly, and wear it in the spirit of these regulations, and I don’t think anyone will have room to criticize you.

If they do, what are they going to do about a minor disagreement about the interpretation of the regulations, when you’re trying to do the right thing?

Besides, you can print these regs out and put them in your pocket.

I’ll bet any fussy busybody won’t have a copy of the regs with them.

Besides, what are they going to do about it anyway if you’re trying to do the right thing?

De Oppresso Liber!

Randy Givens

aka COL George R. Givens, US Army, Retired

http://www.army.mil/usapa/epubs/pdf/r670_1.pdf

Army Regulation 670–1

Uniforms and Insignia

Wear and Appearance of Army Uniforms and Insignia

AR 670–1 • 3 February 2005

1–10. When the wear of the Army uniform is required or prohibited

Page 8

j. Wearing Army uniforms is prohibited in the following situations:

(1) In connection with the furtherance of any political or commercial interests, or when engaged in off-duty civilian

employment.

(2) When participating in public speeches, interviews, picket lines, marches, rallies, or public demonstrations, except

as authorized by competent authority.

(3) When attending any meeting or event that is a function of, or is sponsored by, an extremist organization.

(4) When wearing the uniform would bring discredit upon the Army.

(5) When specifically prohibited by Army regulations.

k. Soldiers will wear headgear with the Army uniform, except under the following circumstances:

(1) Headgear is not required if it would interfere with the safe operation of military vehicles. The wear of military

headgear is not required while in or on a privately owned vehicle (to include a motorcycle, bicycle, or convertible

automobile), a commercial vehicle, or on public conveyance (such as a subway, train, plane, or bus).

(2) Soldiers will not wear headgear indoors unless under arms in an official capacity, or when directed by the

commander, such as for indoor ceremonial activities.

(3) Male and female soldiers are not required to wear headgear to evening social events (after Retreat) when

wearing the Army blue and white uniforms, the enlisted green dress uniform, the Army green maternity dress uniform

(females only), or the mess and evening mess uniforms.

(4) Soldiers will carry their headgear, when it is not worn, in their hands while wearing service, dress, and mess

uniforms. Soldiers are authorized storage of the headgear, when it is not worn, in the BDU cargo pockets. Soldiers

must fold the headgear neatly so as not to present a bulky appearance. Soldiers will not attach headgear to the uniform

or hang it from the belt.

Page 19

3–5. Headgear

a. Beret. …

(5) Green beret.

(a) If approved by local commanders, all Special Forces-qualified personnel (those carrying the Special Forces

MOSs of 18A or 180A, CMF 18, and CSMs reclassified from 18Z to OOZ) are authorized to wear the green beret.

This includes senior and junior ROTC instructors and those attending training at an Army service school in a student

status (for example, CGSC, DLI, or USASMA).

(b) Special Forces personnel will wear the approved flash of the unit to which they are assigned. Special Forces

personnel who are assigned to an organization without an approved flash will wear the generic SF flash (the flash

approved for personnel assigned to SF positions, but not assigned to SF units).

Page 264

28–31. Distinctive items authorized for other than infantry personnel

a. Organizational flash.

(1) Description. A shield-shaped embroidered patch, with a semicircular bottom, approximately 214 inches long and

178 inches wide.

(2) Approval authority. The Institute of Heraldry , U.S. Army, approves the color selection or color combination of

the flash for each organization. The flash is provided without cost to enlisted personnel.

(3) How worn. The flash is sewn centered on the stiffener of the beret (see figs 28–11 and 28–12).

(4) By whom worn. Personnel authorized to wear the maroon, tan, or green berets wear their distinctive organizational

flash. All other soldiers wear the Army flash on the black beret, unless authorization for another flash was

granted before the implementation of the black beret as the standard Army headgear (see para 3–5a(3)(c)).

b. Airborne background trimming.

(1) Description. An oval-shaped embroidered device in distinctive colors, 138 inches in height and 214 inches in

width.

(2) Approval authority. Subject to the approval of The Institute of Heraldry , U.S. Army, a background trimming is

authorized for organizations designated (by structure, equipment, and mission) “Airborne” or “Air Assault” by HQDA.

Qualified personnel are authorized to wear the background trimming with the Parachutist or Air Assault badges.

Personnel wear only one background trimming at a time. Appropriated funds are used to provide enlisted personnel

with the background trimming without cost. If appropriated funds are not available, units may purchase background

trimming with non-appropriated funds.

(3) How worn.

(a) Personnel wear the background trimming beneath any of the authorized parachutist or air assault badges on the

Army green coat and AG 415 shirt. The basic portion of the badge is centered on the background trimming; however,

the wreath and star on the Master and Senior Parachutist badges project slightly above the background trimming. On

the AG 415 shirt when ribbons are worn, all personnel wear the trimming so the bottom edge of the trimming is 14 inch

above the ribbons. When ribbons are not worn, males wear the trimming 14 inch above the pocket seam, and females

wear the trimming in a comparable position.

(b) On the green uniform coat, males wear the background trimming and applicable badge on the pocket flap so the

space between the seam of the pocket flap and the top of the background trimming, wreath, or star is 18 inch (see fig

28–174). Females wear the trimming and applicable badge on the green coat and the maternity uniform tunic so the

bottom edge of the background trimming is 14 inch above the ribbons (see fig 28–175). When worn below the ribbons,

the top of the background trimming is 14 inch below the bottom ribbon row.

Page 314

30–3. Wear of the uniform by retired personnel

a. Personnel who will be advanced to a higher grade upon retirement have the option of wearing the insignia of that

grade thereafter.

b. Retired personnel on active duty will wear their uniform and insignia in the same manner as prescribed for

personnel in the Active Army of corresponding grade and branch.

c. Retired personnel not on active duty may wear either the uniform reflecting their grade and branch on the date of

their retirement, or the uniform for personnel in the Active Army of corresponding grade and branch, when appropriate,

but may not intermix the two uniforms. Personnel will wear the grade as shown on the retired grade of rank line on the

retirement order.

d. Retired personnel not on active duty are not authorized to wear shoulder sleeve insignia, except as follows:

(1) Personnel performing instructor duties at an educational institution conducting courses of instruction approved

(2) Retired personnel are authorized to wear the shoulder sleeve insignia for U.S. Army Retirees on the left

shoulder. The insignia consists of a white cloth disc with a blue border, and an inner white disc with a red border,

which bears a blue and white adaptation of the coat of arms of the United States . The outer disk that surrounds the coat

of arms contains the inscription “UNITED STATES ARMY” in red letters at the top, and the word “RETIRED” in

blue letters at the bottom (see fig 30–1).

Figure 30–1. Shoulder sleeve insignia, retirees

(3) Retired personnel may wear the shoulder sleeve insignia for former wartime service (SSI–FWTS) on the right

shoulder if they were authorized wear of the SSI–FWTS while on active duty.

e. Retired personnel not on active duty are not authorized to wear the Army uniform when they are instructors or

responsible for military discipline at an educational institution, unless the educational institution is conducting courses

of instruction approved by the Armed Forces.

f. In addition to the occasions for wear listed above, retired personnel are authorized to wear the uniform only on the

following occasions. Uniforms for these occasions are restricted to service and dress uniforms; the BDU and physical

fitness uniforms will not be worn.

(1) While attending military funerals, memorial services, weddings, inaugurals, and other occasions of ceremony.

(2) Attending parades on national or state holidays, or other patriotic parades or ceremonies in which any active or

reserve United States military unit is taking part. Wear of the Army uniform at any other time, or for any other purpose

than stated above is prohibited.

g. Retirees are authorized to wear the physical fitness uniform (PFU) or the improved physical fitness uniform

(IPFU) under the following provisions:

(1) May wear the PFU or the IPFU with civilian attire off the installation.

(2) When wearing the PFU or the IPFU as a complete uniform, retirees will—

(a) Wear only authorized accessories corresponding to those worn by personnel of the Active Army.

(b) Keep the sleeves down on the sweatshirt or jacket, the legs down on the pants, and the t-shirt tucked inside the

trunks.

(c) Not roll or push up the sleeves of the IPFU sweatshirt or the PFU/IPFU jacket.

(d) Wear the sleeves of the IPFU sweatshirt cuffed or uncuffed; may not cuff the IPFU jacket sleeves.

(e) Wear the black knit cap pulled down snugly on the head, with the bottom edge of the cap folded up; will not roll

the edge of the cap. A similar, commercially designed black knit cap is authorized for wear.

h. Pregnant retirees are authorized to wear the t-shirt/sweatshirt outside the trunks/sweatpants.

30–4. Wear of the uniform by former members of the Army

a. Unless qualified under another provision of this regulation, or under the provisions of section 772, title 10, United

AR 670–1 • 3 February 2005 315

States Code (10 USC 772), former members of the Army may wear the uniform if they served honorably during a

declared or undeclared war, and if their most recent service was terminated under honorable conditions. Personnel who

qualify under these conditions will wear the Army uniform in the highest grade they held during such war service, in

accordance with 10 USC 772.

b. The uniform is authorized for wear only for the following ceremonial occasions, and when traveling to and from

the ceremony or function. Uniforms for these occasions are restricted to service and dress uniforms; the BDU and

physical fitness uniforms will not be worn.

(1) When attending military funerals, memorial services, weddings, inaugurals, and other occasions of ceremony.

(2) When attending parades on national or state holidays, or other patriotic parades or ceremonies in which any

active or reserve United States military unit is taking part. Wear of the Army uniform at any other time, or for any

other purpose than stated above, is prohibited.

30–5. Wear of the uniform by Medal of Honor recipients.

Personnel awarded the Medal of Honor may wear the Army uniform at their pleasure, except under the circumstances

in paragraph 1–10j.

30–6. Wear of medals on civilian clothes

Retired personnel and former members of the Army (as described above) may wear all categories of medals described

in this regulation on appropriate civilian clothing. This includes clothes designed for veteran and patriotic organizations

on Veteran’s Day, Memorial Day, and Armed Forces Day, as well as at formal occasions of ceremony and social

functions of a military nature. Personnel may wear either full-size or miniature medals. Personnel who wear medals on

civilian clothes should place the medals on the clothing in approximately the same location and in the same manner as

for the Army uniform, so they look similar to medals worn on the Army uniform.

30–7. When wear of the uniform is prohibited

The wear of the Army uniform by ARNG, USAR, retired, separated, and civilian personnel is prohibited under the

circumstances listed in paragraph 1–10j.

30–8. Wear of a uniform similar to the Army uniform

a. A person for whom one of the following uniforms is prescribed may wear the uniform, provided it includes

distinctive insignia prescribed by the Secretary of the Army to distinguish it from the U.S. Army uniform.

(1) Instructors or members of an organized cadet corps at a state university, college, or public high school that has a

regular course of military instruction will wear the uniform prescribed by the academic organization.

(2) Instructors or members of an organized cadet corps at an educational institution that has a regular course of

military instruction in military science with an Army instructor, will wear the uniform prescribed by the academic

organization.

(3) When authorized by regulations prescribed by the Secretary of the Army, members of a military society

composed of persons discharged honorably or under honorable conditions from the U.S. Army may wear the uniform

prescribed by the military society.

b. According to section 773(b), title 10, United States Code (10 USC 773(b)), none of the uniforms prescribed in

paragraph a, above, may include insignia or grade the same as or similar to those prescribed for officers of the Army,

Navy, Air Force, or Marine Corps.

c. State defense forces (SDF) may adopt the Army service and BDU uniforms, provided all service uniform buttons,

cap devices, and other insignia differ significantly from that prescribed for wear by members of the U.S. Army. State

insignia will not include “ United States ,” “ U.S. ,” “U.S. Army,” or the Great Seal of the United States . Personnel of the

SDF may wear a State-designed SDF distinguishing badge or insignia centered on the left pocket flap. The red

nametape or nameplate will include the full title of the SDF (for example, “ Texas State Guard”). The utility uniforms

will contain a State SDF tape in lieu of “U.S. Army” over the left breast pocket. States wishing to adopt the Army

service and utility uniforms will register with the Chief, National Guard Bureau.

30–9. Wear of distinctive unit insignia on civilian clothing

Former members of an Army unit may wear the distinctive unit insignia on the breast pocket or lapel.

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Retiree newsletter says retirees can wear the black beret.

http://74.125.47.132/search?q=cache:MBSQHR-oNRYJ:www.armyg1.army.mil/Rso/docs/echoes/01_Nov.pdf+regulation+Army+retiree+Special+Forces+wear+beret+functions&cd=26&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=us

Retirees, uniforms & new berets

Since the introduction of the new Army beret, we have gotten questions regarding

retiree wear of the uniform in general and the beret in particular. This guidance was

provided by the Human Resources Directorate of the Army’s Deputy Chief of Staff for

Personnel.

As a retiree, you are authorized to wear the uniform for occasions of ceremony,

patriotic events, and other military-related functions. Additionally, if you are an ROTC

instructor, you are authorized wear of the uniform, with the Cadet Command shoulder

sleeve insignia.

If you are not assigned to Cadet Command as an ROTC instructor, you do not wear

any shoulder sleeve insignia on the left shoulder, unless you wish to wear the “Retired”

insignia. You may wear the combat patch on the right shoulder, if you were authorized

wear of one while in the service. Additionally, you wear the rank at which you retired,

and all permanently awarded decorations and badges.

Since you are authorized wear of the uniform, you also are authorized to wear the

black beret with the Army flash, since it is the standard headgear for the Army. The

Army flash is the only flash authorized for wear on the black beret.

Unfortunately, the supply of berets with the Army flash is limited right now, and

fielding of the active and reserve components is not expected to be complete until next

year. Therefore, the black beret will not be available for purchase in clothing sales

stores until then. Until it's available, retirees can wear the garrison cap, or the green

service (saucer) cap

==========================================

Sounds like some of the same issues we may all have had from time to time. Lt James Evans and myself battled IOBC early 71 after returning from Vietnam with SOG and 5th SFGA service. We wore our berets throughout the training in opposition to directions not to do so. We were told we could not attend the Semi-tactical field training exercise because we would not wear the baseball cap and we were told that we would wear low quarters and Saucer cap for graduation, we refused, were told we were going to be court-martialed, still we refused. At the last minute, we were told to get our diplomas and get off post.
Jame and I had both been assigned as Range Officers at Ft Benning, we made a couple of calls and were sent to the 1st Group.
FOOT NOTE: Jame returned from the 1st Group before I did, he became a sheriff deputy for Los Angles and was later killed in action in a famous shoot-out with bank robbers.
Robert L. Noe

From: "Henry Cook" <hjcook@cableone.net>

Hey Guys,

Just a couple of “war-stories” regarding wear of the Green Beret. I personally do not know of anyone who gotten their ass in the crack more than me over the alleged “un-authorized” wear of headgear. It first started in 1963 when myself, Pappy Grandy and Roy Savoie were all attending the US Army Intelligence School at Ft. Holabird , MD. Yes, that is where the school was located before it was moved to AZ. As we fell out for the Friday evening parade we were all wearing berets and jump boots while the school uniform called for bus driver’s hats and low quarters for the parade. We were passed from the first sgt to the company CO and then to the Bn Cdr and finally told to report to the office of the school commandant on Monday morning for “discipline.” On Monday morning MSG “Pappy” Grandy told us to keep our berets on and our mouths shut and wear them into the Commandant’s office. Twice we were told to remove them and return to our quarters for the “proper head gear.” While waiting to see the Col. , Pappy called Ft. Bragg and spoke to General Stillwell and he called the school commandant and locked his heels while we were in his office. The story made Army Times and we were “punished” by not being allowed to march in the Friday parades, we had to stand at the sidelines (in our Berets and Jump Boots) and watch and we could not leave post until the parade was over.

While at the Intel School we journeyed over to Ft Lee one day to make a parachute jump to keep current and there too we were told to remove “those hats.” We did not and Ft Lee personnel refused to certify our qualifying jumps and we were denied jump pay for that three month period. That one went to court and we won and had our jump pay restored for the missing quarter. That was also the subject of an Army Times article.

Secondly, when I graduated from IOBC at Ft. Benning I was not allowed to appear on stage for the graduation and took my diploma at the side door because I insisted that I was authorized to wear “that silly hat,” as it was described by General Berry.

There are more stories like this that I will be happy to share with you both over an adult beverage. Will you be at the SOAR in September?

I only tell you these stories to clearly state my personal(outside of the regs) position over wearing of the beret. Once I was “entitled” to the beret, I did not merely rely on a piece of paper to tell me if I could wear it or not.

I sent out the note regarding funerals because I thought MG Bargewell had a good point and I fully support it. I too, do no like wearing the “Retired” patch and when I have appeared in uniform I simply removed my left shoulder unit patch and have that one bare except for the SF qualification tab.

My only rub is with those “wannabes” who may have worn the beret for a short period of time and who, in spite of the war lasting ten years, always found a way not to attend. Some of those same people have criticized my wear of the uniform at functions in which the chapter was involved.

Looking forward to anymore discussion on this matter as you desire.

De Oppresso Liber

Henry Cook

BTW—I am in the running for a position on the Board of directors for the SOA and I need and would appreciate your support.